Monday, January 17, 2011

Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Tools of Freedom: FULL TEXT 'Letter from a Birmingham Jail'

Note: For Americans that actually care about justice, rather than just give it lip service, it is important to note that in 1999 during a televised trial, yet unknown to the masses of asses, Dr. William Pepper won his case, proving that there had been a conspiracy that colluded in the murder of Dr. King, that it was not James Earl Ray, that in fact was all of your favorite fascist suspect factions of the Memphis Police, the Tennessee State Police, the FBI, the CIA and the US Military. There is a link below for those friends needing the education.

The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. - Martin Luther King, Jr.

Ethan Jacobs, J.D. -- Activist Post

Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated April 4, 1968, shortly after he started speaking out against the global elite and the injustice they inflict on all of humanity though orchestrated wars and economic oppression. He believed that "a nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death."[1]

While King may not physically be with us today, we are fortunate that he left us with powerful principles and tools for defeating tyranny. King, Gandhi and many others have set the precedent for our liberation, proving that courage, love, persistence, and some simple tools are ultimately victorious.

In fact, the tools and principles utilized by King are so powerful that they rocked the foundation of the global elite’s power structure. As Andrew Gavin Marshall writes:

When Martin Luther King began speaking about more than race, and openly criticized the entire social structure of empire and economic exploitation, not simply of blacks, but of all people around the world and at home, he posed too great a threat to the oligarchy to tolerate him any longer. It was at this point that the National Security State chose to assassinate Martin Luther King, and the philanthropies greatly expanded their financing of the Civil Rights Movement to ensure that it would be led in their desired direction.[2]

Hatred for King by the elite’s agents in government intensified after he publicly identified the U.S. government as “the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today.” The FBI and U.S military kept King under 24-hour surveillance, and agents had infiltrated the civil rights movement. Therefore, the elites were aware of King’s Poor People’s Campaign for Washington D.C., where King planned to shut down the nation’s capital in the spring of 1968 through massive civil disobedience until the government agreed to combat economic inequality in the United States rather than drop bombs on Vietnam.

On December 8, 1999, in the wrongful death lawsuit filed by the King Family, a jury composed of six white and six black people deliberated less than three hours to find that Loyd Jowers (who confessed on television in 1999) and others “including governmental agencies,” were parties to the conspiracy to assassinate Martin Luther King, Jr.[3] During closing argument, King family attorney William Pepper stated: “When Martin King opposed the war, when he rallied people to oppose the war, he was threatening the bottom lines of some of the largest defense contractors in this country. This was about money. He was threatening the weapons industry, the hardware, the armaments industries, that would all lose as a result of the end of the war.”[4]

All Americans would be well advised to review the evidence that was presented at the trial.

Now we shall examine Martin Luther King, Jr.’s principles and tools for restoring freedom in greater detail, committing them to memory by applying them with action each day.


No comments:

Post a Comment